About DIT

Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) is a simple short term (16 sessions) individual therapy protocol for mood disorder. The protocol was designed on the basis of the work of the Expert Reference Group on clinical competencies which worked on identifying key components drawn from manualized psychoanalytic/dynamic therapies. It is an easy to acquire, semi-structured, treatment protocol. This protocol for brief dynamic work is the one intended to be rolled out nationally within the IAPT programme for work with depressed patients and hence DIT training is IAPT supported. Read more here.

DIT Founders

Alessandra Lemma   *   Peter Fonagy   *   Mary Target

Background to the development of DIT

DIT was explicitly developed out of the Psychoanalytic/dynamic Competences Framework (Lemma et al., 2008) that provided the basis for the National Occupational Standards (NOS). It is consequently drawn from those psychoanalytic/dynamic approaches with the strongest empirical evidence for efficacy, based on the outcome of controlled trials. It is specifically designed to address presenting symptoms of depression and anxiety.

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DIT and IAPT 

DIT is the brief psychodynamic therapy model now offered at Step 3 within IAPT. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for depression state that brief psychodynamic therapy is one option that can be considered for depressed patients either when the patient has not responded to CBT interventions, or where the patient actively opts for a psychodynamic approach.

Differences between DIT & IPT

Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) have several common features but they are NOT the same therapy and the approaches draw on specific and distinct competencies Read more

Resources

You can see reading list recommended for DIT training here.

If you would like to purchase a copy of 'Brief Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy' book by A. Lemma, M. Target and P. Fonagy (£25) please contact patrizia.berardi@annafreud.org

 

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