Details

Length:
1 day

About this course

186939100(1).jpg

"Clinical perfectionism" is a highly specific construct designed to capture the type of perfectionism that can often pose problems in routine therapeutic practice. The core psychopathology of clinical perfectionism is an over evaluation of achievement and striving that causes significant adverse consequences. Clinical perfectionism has been implicated in the maintenance of psychopathology, in particular eating disorders. A specific cognitive-behavioural intervention has been developed by the Oxford Eating Disorders Research Group for the treatment of clinical perfectionism in Axis I disorders including eating disorders, anxiety disorders and depression. The intervention has been positively evaluated in a small randomized controlled trial and is part of a broad CBT intervention for eating disorders.

The workshop is aimed at intermediate-advanced cognitive-behaviour therapists. It will provide a cognitive-behavioural analysis of clinical perfectionism and the factors that contribute to its maintenance. Relevant research literature and current evidence-base for interventions will be provided. Although this work has been developed in relation to adults, it will also be relevant for those working with adolescents with perfectionist ideas and beliefs. Young people with perfectionism can find the transition to independent learning particularly stressful and this workshop will specifically address those issues along with dealing with social and academic evaluation. They will also be familiar with relevant cognitive-behavioural strategies. The workshop will be interactive and include both experiential and didactic teaching and videos. Participants will have a chance to discuss their own cases.

Who is this course suitable for?

Clinicians experienced in CBT working with clinical perfectionism. Although this work has been developed in relation to adults, it will also be relevant for those working with adolescents with perfectionist ideas and beliefs.

Aims of the course?

To help clinicians to assess clinical perfectionism and determine when it may warrant a specific intervention.