22nd November 2017 By: Niall McGourty

A counter movement to Black Friday shopping mania will this year benefit the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families

#GiveBackFriday is an initiative led by the Deer Shed Festival in North Yorkshire. It aims to turn Black Friday upside down by encouraging giving and charity over the 'clamour' for spending and discount shopping.

For their part, the Deer Shed has pledged that this Friday, £10 from every adult Deer Shed ticket sold will go straight to the Centre, supporting the mental health of children and families!

Announcing the initiative, Deer Shed wrote,

“The Deer Shed Festival team love a bargain as much as anyone. The annual pandemonium of Black Friday – originally a one-day, price-slashing spectacle coaxing consumers into loosening their purse strings, that now takes up most of our late November calendar – has left them just a tad disillusioned in recent years, though.

“In 2016, according to the BBC, the whole Black Friday week, from Monday 21 November to Monday 28 November, witnessed online sales rise to an estimated £6.5bn. It is now not uncommon to see shoppers literally tussling in supermarkets to seize the best deal.

“In the hope of calming the clamour for a cut-price deal and restoring a bit of compassion to quite a crazy consumerist trend, the festival have pledged to donate £10 from every full adult weekend ticket sold on 24th November for #GiveBackFriday to Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families mental health service.”


AFNCCF Chief Operating Officer, Ros Bidmead said,

"I think this is wonderful idea and a great way for people to support children's mental health while securing their place at a fantastic summer festival.

"Deer Shed is a vibrant family event and so we are delighted that they have identified with us and decided to support the work that we are doing with children and families every day.

"It's a fantastic partnership and the money raised this Friday will go on to support children, young people and families struggling to cope with difficult mental health conditions."


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