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Deputy Programme Director & Senior Research Tutor, MSc Early Child Development and Clinical Applications (formerly known as PDP)

Teaching Experience

Dr Panagiotopoulou has taught and supervised students across a number of UCL programmes (undergraduate and postgraduate), and has been Deputy Programme Director for the MSc Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology. She is now Deputy Programme Director and Senior Research Tutor for the MSc Early Child Development and Clinical Applications. 

Research Experience

Dr Panagiotopoulou’sresearch interests revolve around how our embodiment, including the rooting of the mind in our embodied interactions with other people, influences how we understand ourselves. Her current projects are building a focus on perinatal mind and body researchexploring women’s transitioning to motherhood and their psychological and bodily experiences during pregnancy, birth and beyond and how these may influence the quality of parenting. Her doctoral research was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Neuropsychoanalysis Foundation (NPSA). 

Together with Dr Perez and Dr Roberts, they have established a new research group investigating longitudinal experiences of being a parent at different stages in early parenthood - the Longitudinal Experiences and Adjustments in Parenthood Study (LEAPS). She is also a research collaborator of Professor Katerina Fotopoulou’s lab at UCL (https://www.fotopoulou.com/elena-panagiotopoulou/). 

Clinical Experience

Dr Panagiotopoulou’s clinical experience involves work with people across different stages of development (e.g. infants, toddlers, pre-school children, young people, and adults) in different services of the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, UCL Student Disability Services and the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Athens.

Publications

List of relevant publications and preprints: 

Stumpfogger, N. & Panagiotopoulou, E. (under review). Blurred Body Boundaries of First-Time Mothers: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Neuropsychoanalysis

Jackson, P., Kearney, N. & Panagiotopoulou, E. (under review). Barriers and facilitators to engaging with a school-based yoga program: A qualitative exploration of adolescent girls’ views. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.

Perez, A., Panagiotopoulou, E., Curtis, P., & Roberts, R. (2021). Barriers and facilitators to mood and confidence in pregnancy and early parenthood during COVID-19 in the UK: A mixed-methods synthesis survey. BJ Psych Open. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjo.2021.925

Panagiotopoulou, E., Peiris, C., & Hayes, D. (2021). Behaviour Change Techniques in mobile apps targeting self-harm in young people: a systematic review. Translational Behavioural Medicinehttps://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibaa131 

De Meulemeester, C., Lowyck B., Panagiotopoulou, E., Fotopoulou, A. & Luyten, P. (2020). Self–other distinction and borderline personality disorder features: Evidence for egocentric and altercentric bias in a self–other facial morphing task. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research and Treatment. doi: 10.1037/per0000415.

Jenkinson, P., Koukoutsakis, A., Panagiotopoulou, E., Vagnoni, E., Demartini, B., Nisticò, V., ... Fotopoulou, A. (2020). Body appearance values modulate risk aversion in eating restriction. PsyArXIvhttps://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/rnzgs 

Panagiotopoulou, E., Crucianelli, L., Lemma, A., & Fotopoulou, A. (2020). Identifying with the Beautiful: Facial attractiveness effects on unisensory and multisensory self-other distinction. PsyArXiv, https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/6rcyg

Panagiotopoulou, E., Filippetti, M.L., Gentsch, A., Fotopoulou, A. (2018). Dissociable sources of erogeneity in social touch: Imagining and perceiving C-Tactile optimal touch in erogenous zones. PLoS ONE, 13(8): e0203039 

Panagiotopoulou, E., Filippetti, M.L., Tsakiris, M., & Fotopoulou, A. (2017) Affective Touch Enhances Self- Face Recognition During Multisensory Integration. Scientific Reports, 7: 12883 

Gentsch, A., Panagiotopoulou, E., & Fotopoulou, A. (2015). Active Interpersonal Touch Gives Rise to the Social Softness Illusion. Current Biology, 25(18), 2392-2397

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