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  • The impact of universal, school based, interventions on help seeking in children and young people: a systematic literature review

    Universal help-seeking interventions in schools to support young people’s mental health have been widely used, but we know little about their initial impact and longer term follow-up. This systematic literature review aims to explore the impact of these types of programmes across different help-seeking constructs. Authors: Hayes, D., Mansfield, R., Mason, C., Santos, J., Moore, A., Boehnke, J., Ashworth, E., Moltrecht, B., Humphrey, N., Stallard, P., Patalay, P., & Deighton, J. (2023).

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  • Evaluation of reliable improvement rates in depression and anxiety at the end of treatment in adolescents

    The aim of this study was to consider how many adolescents report reliable improvement in anxiety, depression and comorbid depression and anxiety by end of treatment. Authors: Edbrooke-Childs, J., Wolpert, M., Zamperoni, V., Napelone, E., Bear, H. (2018).

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  • Barriers and facilitators to shared decision making in child and youth mental health: clinician perspectives using the Theorectial Domains Framework

    Shared decision making (SDM) is increasingly being suggested as an integral part of mental health provision. Yet, there is little research on what clinicians believe the barriers and facilitators around practice to be. Authors: Hayes, D., Edbrooke-Childs, J., Town, R., Wolpert, M., Midgley, N. (2018).

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  • Evaluating the Peer Education Project in secondary schools

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the efficacy of the Peer Education Project (PEP), a school-based, peer-led intervention designed to support secondary school students to develop the skills and knowledge they need to safeguard their mental health and that of their peers. Authors: Eisenstein, C., Zamperoni, V., Humphrey, N., Deighton, J., Wolpert, M., Rosan, C., Bohan, H., Kousoulis, A., Promberger, M., and Edbrooke-Childs, J. (2019).

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  • Psychological mediators of the association between childhood emotional abuse and depression: a systematic review

    This review critically evaluates empirical studies examining psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood emotional abuse and subsequent depression. Authors: Li, E., Luyten, P., & Midgley, N. (2020).

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  • Burnout among psychotherapists: a cross-cultural value survey among 12 European countries during the coronavirus disease pandemic

    The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural differences, as operationalized by Schwartz's refined theory of basic values, in burnout levels among psychotherapists from 12 European countries during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Authors: Van Hoy, A., et al. (2022).

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  • Trust me! Parental embodied mentalizing predicts infant cognitive and language development in longitudinal follow-up

    In this investigation we employed both verbal and non-verbal, body-based, approaches to parental mentalizing, to examine whether parental mentalizing in a clinical sample predicts children’s cognitive and language development 12 months later. Authors: Shai, D., Laor Black, A., Spencer, R., Sleed, M., Baradon, T., Nolte, T., Fonagy, P. (2022).

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  • Psychological mediators of the association between childhood emotional abuse and depression: a systematic review

    This review critically evaluates empirical studies examining psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood emotional abuse and subsequent depression. Authors: Li, E., Luyten, P., & Midgley, N. (2020).

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  • The evidence base for psychoanalytic and psychodynamic interventions with children under five years of age and their caregivers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    The systematic review of 77 research studies, including 5,660 participants, shows that therapy in the very early months and years of life can help to prevent and reduce mental health difficulties both for parents and carers and their children by focusing on the crucial relationship between them. Authors: Sleed, M., Li, E., Vainieri, I., & Midgley, N. (2022).