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  • Coping with the stresses of daily life in England: a qualitative study of self-care strategies and social and professional support in early adolescence

    The aim of our study was to examine early adolescents’ perspectives on and experiences of coping with the problems, difficult situations and feelings that can arise in daily life in England. Authors: Stapley, E., Demkowicz, O., Eisenstadt, M., Wolpert, M., & Deighton, J. (2019).

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  • Is mental health competence in childhood associated with health risk behaviors in adolescence? Findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study

    Using UK Millennium Cohort Study data (n = 10,142), we examined how mental health competence (MHC) measured at the end of elementary school (11 years) is associated with self-reported use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, alcohol, illegal drugs, antisocial behaviour and sexual contact with another young person at age 14 years. Authors: Rougeaux, E., Hope, S., Viner, R. M., Deighton, J., Law, C., & Pearce, A. (2020).

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  • Children and young people’s experiences of completing mental health and wellbeing measures for research: learning from two school-based pilot projects

    This research set out to explore the way that children and young people perceive and experience completing mental health and wellbeing measures, with a specific focus on completion in a school context, in order to inform future measure and research design. Authors: Demkowicz, O., Ashworth, E., Mansfield, R., Stapley, E., Miles, H., Hayes, D., Burrell, K., Moore, A., & Deighton, J. (2020).

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  • A narrative review of reviews of interconnecting risks (IR) of mental health problems for young people

    The aim of this narrative review is to examine the most prevalent multiple or interconnecting risks of mental health problems that have been identified in previous reviews of the literature and to examine those most prevalent for children and young people. Authors: Edbrooke-Childs, J., Deighton, J. (2021).

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  • A qualitative investigation of LGBTQ+ young people’s experiences and perceptions of self-managing their mental health

    LGBTQ+ young people are more likely than their peers to experience a mental health difficulty and may be less likely to draw on specialist support due to fears of discrimination. However, little is known about LGBTQ+ young people's experiences and perceptions of self-managing their mental health. Using a multimodal qualitative design, 20 LGBTQ+ young people participated in a telephone interview or an online focus group. Authors: Town, R., Hayes, D., Fonagy, P., Stapley, E. (2021).

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  • What metrics of harm are being captured in clinical trials involving talking treatments for young people? A systematic review of registered studies on the ISRCTN

    The recording of harm and adverse events in psychological trials is essential, yet the types of harm being captured in trials for talking treatments involving children and young people have not been systematically investigated. The aim of this review was to determine how often harm and adverse events are recorded in talking treatments for children and young people, as well as the metrics that are being collected. Authors: Hayes, D., Za'ba, N. (2021).

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  • Realist process evaluation of the implementation and impact of an organisational cultural transformation programme in the children and young people's secure estate (CYPSE) in England: study protocol

    The Framework for Integrated Care (SECURE STAIRS) is being implemented in the Children and Young People's Secure Estate: a 'whole systems' approach to support secure settings to develop trauma-informed and relationally based environments, supporting staff to provide consistent, therapeutic care. This paper aims to present the protocol for a national cohort study examining the impact and implementation of this cultural transformation programme. Authors: D'Souza, S., Lane, R., Jacob, J., Livanou, M., Riches, W., Rogers, A., Ullman, R., Rashid, A., Singleton, R., Wheeler, J., Bevington, D., Deighton, J., Fonagy, P., Fuggle, P., Law, D., & Edbrooke-Childs, J., (2021).

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  • Characteristics of young people accessing recently implemented Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (F:CAMHS) in England: insights from national service activity data.

    Children and young people in contact with forensic child and adolescent mental health services present with more complex needs than young people in the general population. This research examines the characteristics of children and young people referred to recently commissioned Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Services (F:CAMHS) and service activity during the first 24 months of service. Authors: Lane, R., D’Souza, S., Singleton, R., Hindley, N., Bevington, D., White, O., Jacob, J., Wheeler, J., & Edbrooke-Childs, J. (2021).

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  • Empowering and supporting parents/carers of high-risk young people assisted by Community Forensic CAMHS

    Thirteen Community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (F:CAMHS) across England were developed to provide specialist support to young people at high risk of harm to self and in particular others, and their families. The aim of this study is to explore parent/carer experiences of Community F:CAMHS. Thematic analysis of interviews was conducted. Superordinate themes generated focused on 1) facilitators; and 2) barriers to support. Authors: Jacobs, J., Lane, R., D’Souza, S., Cracknell, L., White, O., & Edbrooke-Childs, J. (2022).

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